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Causes of infertility in women

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Causes of infertility in women

Causes of infertility in women

What Causes Female Infertility?
There are a number of things that may be keeping you from getting pregnant:

Damage to your fallopian tubes

These structures carry eggs from your ovaries, which produce eggs, to the uterus, where the baby develops. They can get damaged when scars form after pelvic infections, endometriosis, and pelvic surgery. That can prevent sperm from reaching an egg in the tube. The egg and sperm meet in the tube. This is where the egg is fertilized and then moves down to the uterus to implant..

Hormonal problems

You may not be getting pregnant because your body isn’t going through the usual hormone changes that lead to the release of an egg from the ovary and the thickening of the lining of the uterus.

Cervical issues

Some women have a condition that prevents sperm from passing through the cervical canal.

Causes of infertility in women
Uterine trouble

You may have polyps and fibroids that interfere with getting pregnant. Uterine polyps occur when too many cells grow in the endometrium, the lining of the uterus. Fibroids grow in the wall of the uterus. Other abnormalities of the uterus can also interfere,

“Unexplained” infertility

For about 20% of couples who have infertility problems, the exact causes are never pinpointed.

Tests for Infertility

Your doctor may order several tests, including a blood test to check hormone levels and an endometrial biopsy to examine the lining of your uterus.

(1) Hysterosalpingography(HSG)

This procedure involves ultrasound or X-rays of your reproductive organs. A doctor injects either dye or saline and air into your cervix, which travel up through your fallopian tubes. With this method, your doctor can check to see if the tubes are blocked.

(2)Laparoscopy

Your doctor puts a laparoscope (a slender tube fitted with a tiny camera)through a small cut near your belly button. This lets him view the outside of your uterus, ovaries, and fallopian tubes to check for abnormal growths. The doctor can also see if your fallopian tubes are blocked.

How Is Female Infertility Treated?

(1)Laparoscopy

If you’ve been diagnosed with tubal or pelvic disease, one option is to get surgery to reconstruct your reproductive organs. Your doctor puts a laparoscope through a cut near your belly button to get rid of scar tissue, treat endometriosis, open blocked tubes, or remove ovarian cysts, which are fluid-filled sacs that can form in the ovaries or not.

(2)Hysteroscopy

In this procedure, your doctor places a hysteroscope into your uterus through your cervix. It’s used to remove polyps and fibroid tumors, divide scar tissue, and open up blocked tubes.

(3)Medication

If you have ovulation problems, you may be prescribed drugs such as clomiphene citrate (Clomid, Serophene), gonadotropins (such as Gonal-F, Follistim, Humegon and Pregnyl), or letrozole.

Gonadotropins can trigger ovulation when Clomid or Serophene don’t work. These drugs also can also help you get pregnant by causing your ovaries to release multiple eggs. Normally, only one egg is released each month.

Your doctor may suggest that you take gonadotropin if you have unexplained infertility or when other kinds of treatment haven’t helped you get pregnant.

Metformin (Glucophage) is another type of medication that may help you ovulate normally if you have insulin resistance or PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome).

Causes of infertility in women

(4)Intrauterine insemination

For this procedure, after semen gets rinsed with a special solution, a doctor places it into your uterus when you’re ovulating. It’s sometimes done while you’re taking meds that help trigger the release of an egg.

(5)In vitro fertilization (IVF)

In this technique, your doctor places embryos into your uterus that were fertilized in a dish.

You take gonadotropins that trigger the development of more than one egg. When the eggs are mature, your doctor uses an ultrasound for guidance and collects them with a needle.

Sperm are then collected, washed, and added to the eggs in the dish. Several days later, embryos — or fertilized eggs — get put back into your uterus with a device called an intrauterine insemination catheter.

If you and your partner agree, extra embryos can be frozen and saved to use later.

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13 years of marriage with a child,3 failed IVF broken by the peoples doctor

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The peoples doctor medical center celebrate

The peoples doctor medical center celebrate

13 years of marriage with a child,3 failed IVF broken by the peoples doctor

The peoples doctors medical center in deep celebration after a patient put to bed

After 13 years in marriage with 3 failed IVF, and bilateral blocked tubes (both tubes blocked) a certain woman in Lagos state finally got pregnant and just delivered not too long ago….

The peoples doctor medical center celebrate

Her sad story started turning around for good when she met the people’s doctor on Instagram

A female Nigerian doctor who’s gifted by God with all it takes to make those who are trying to conceive, get pregnant and welcome their babies..

I happen to know her and this whole story, that’s why I’m writing this now and this is something that should be on first page for my fellow Nigerians to see… There are lots of homes that are still looking for their first child… Uncle…. Aunty.. Brother… sister… Let’s leave village people alone, they don’t have any business with your womb or sperm.I got to discover that 99% of families looking for children are not just doing some medical things right and most of them don’t know, they’ll say it’s village people..

Like the people’s doctor would always say, a lot of TTCs(trying to conceive) are still where they are out of IGNORANCE AND THE WRONG DOCTORS THEY MEET. Don’t say I didn’t pass this message, grab this opportunity now…. Follow her on Instagram @ https://www.instagram.com/thepeoples_doctors/
To cut the long story short, look at their conversation, I happen to have itThe peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate The peoples doctor medical center celebrate

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Brazilian man becomes first person to be ‘cured’ of HIV with drugs alone

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Brazilian man becomes first person to be 'cured’ of HIV with drugs alone

Brazilian man becomes first person to be ‘cured’ of HIV with drugs alone

Brazilian man becomes first person to be 'cured’ of HIV with drugs alone

A 35-year-old Brazilian man who has gone into long-term remission after being diagnosed with an accelerated multi-drug regimen of AIDS drugs for less than a year has boosted expectations for a possible breakthrough on Tuesday July 7.
The man who tested HIV positive in 2012 was treated with an antiretroviral therapy or ART base that was boosted with additional antiretrovirals, plus a drug called nicotinamide (a vitamin B3 form).

His increased care was stopped after 48 weeks, and researchers who reported their results at this week’s virtual International Aids Society conference said that the patient has now been without HIV medication for more than 57 weeks and continues to test negative for HIV antibodies.

Dr Ricardo Diaz of the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil, who led the study said he was “trying to wake up the virus” and boost the immune system’s ability to eliminate it once it’s flushed out of hiding.

 

Diaz said;

 

“We can’t search the entire body, but by the best evidence, we do not have infected cells.

“I think it’s very promising. This patient might be cured, but it will take more time to know.”

 

Professor Sharon Lewin, an HIV and infectious diseases expert at the University of Melbourne who was not involved in the research, said the fact that the patient has no antibodies was significant.

 

She said;

 

“When someone is infected with a virus they make antibodies. And antibodies don’t budge, even when you’re on treatment and there’s no detectable viral load. But this showed he had no antibodies which is supportive of him being cured.

“It’s interesting, but it’s hard to know how significant it is when it’s just a single case. I’d also like to know what happened to the other patients.”

In the past five years, after undergoing high-risk stem cell bone marrow transplants to treat cancer, only two people known as “Berlin” and “London” patients seem to have been cured of the disease.

Since the AIDS epidemic started in the 1980s more than 75 million people have been infected. The virus also caused 33 million deaths

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Australia’s second-largest city, Melbourne heads back into Coronavirus lockdown

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Australia's second-largest city, Melbourne heads back into Coronavirus lockdown

Australia’s second-largest city, Melbourne heads back into Coronavirus lockdown

Australia's second-largest city, Melbourne heads back into Coronavirus lockdown

Nearly five million Melbourne residents were forced back into another lockdown after Coronavirus cases spiked on Tuesday, July 7, in Australia’s second-largest city.

All in Melbourne will be required to stay home from midnight on Wednesday, July 8, unless they go to work , study, shop for food or attend medical appointments. Restaurants, cafes and bars can only have delivery service, gyms and hair salons are closed, family events are restricted to two persons and the existing school holidays are extended.

Victoria state prime minister Daniel Andrews declared a six-week freeze, saying the virus crisis is over “we can’t pretend.”

After 191 of the 199 new cases recorded nationally on Tuesday were identified by the south-east region, the largest one-day increase since early April, Andrews said there were now too many to track properly, so restrictions were required.

“Those are numbers that are unsustainably high,” he said. “No-one wants to be in this place. I know there will be massive quantities of harm that will be caused because of this.

“We need to be transparent to one another that this is not over,” said Andrews. “And pretending it’s because we just want it to be over isn’t the solution. It’s actually part of the problem. A very big part of the issue.”

The decision was taken hours before it was expected for the first time in a century to close the busy border between Victoria and New South Wales.

Nearly 9,000 cases of COVID-19 and 106 deaths from the virus were reported in Australia.

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